Dave Powell

ASSIGNMENTS

Check here to find the links you need to submit your work to me. Simply click the link associated with the assignment you are submitting––make sure you choose the correct one––and then follow the simple instructions to upload your work.

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FYS 143-2


Reading Log Essay 1

Assignment Description: This course comes with a fairly heavy reading load and you will be expected to complete your reading assignments diligently and on time. Please take this responsibility very seriously. Not only is your willingness to do this work critical to your success in the course, but it’s also critical to the success of others: without active, informed participation by everyone, we will have a difficult time accomplishing everything we hope to accomplish this semester. Plan to take notes on everything you read. Twice you’ll synthesize your thoughts and refine your log into short essays of about 1,500 words. Due Sunday, September 23.


Reading Log Essay 2

Assignment Description: This course comes with a fairly heavy reading load and you will be expected to complete your reading assignments diligently and on time. Please take this responsibility very seriously. Not only is your willingness to do this work critical to your success in the course, but it’s also critical to the success of others: without active, informed participation by everyone, we will have a difficult time accomplishing everything we hope to accomplish this semester. Plan to take notes on everything you read. Twice you’ll synthesize your thoughts and refine your log into short essays of about 1,500 words. Due Sunday, November 4.


COURSE PROJECT INSTRUCTIONS

The course project is composed of three parts: the Protest Song Analysis, the Protest Playlist & Liner Notes, and a summative project. Click on the heading above for more detailed instructions.

Protest Song Analysis

Assignment Description: There are so many songs profiled in Dorian Lynskey’s book, 33 Revolutions Per Minute, that it’ll take you several years to get your money’s worth out of it. That’s a good thing! It’s also a great resource to use as you begin to develop your own personal framework for assessing protest music (or, really, anything you want to systematically assess). For this project I’ll ask you to choose a song profiled in Lynskey’s book and read the chapter associated with it; then you’ll need to choose another song—it can be a song we discuss in class, or any song you feel is appropriate—and write a short analysis of it, using Lynskey’s work as a guide. You can compare the song you choose on your own to the song you select from Lynskey’s book, or you can simply write about the song you select. The choice is up to you. Due Sunday, November 18.


Protest Playlist & Liner Notes

Assignment Description: This is a class about music, and about the way music shapes our sensibilities, our ways of experiencing the world, and our political values. As we finish the course you’ll create your own protest music playlist, complete with liner notes, and share it with us. Your playlist must include a minimum of 15 songs (no more than 20!), and can focus on a single issue or era or may span several of them. Due December 5.


Summative (Group) Project

Assignment Description: The purpose of the summative project is to give you an an opportunity to design. project that shows what you have learned over the course of the semester about the unique role protest music plays in shaping and supporting social, political, and cultural change. You are encouraged to work in groups of no more than four to conceive and carry out a project that addresses the three major themes of our course…

  • History: how do protest songs and related forms of expression help reframe our understanding of the past and its impact on the present and future?
  • Democracy: how do these songs elevate or amplify the voices of people who are not always heard in our political discourse? how do they promote the idea of creating an inclusive, justice-oriented democracy?
  • Communication: how do the authors and performers of songs we have identified as “protest” songs attempt to persuade their listeners? when are they successful? when are they not?

Ideally, your project will provide me with a clear sense of how the course has (or has not) affected your view of the current state of the world. Make it a good one!

NOTE: If you have files to submit for any portions of the course project, use the links above (i.e. the titles of each assignment) to submit them. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated!


Education 199


Initial Philosophy Statement

Assignment Description: Before we dig into the history of American education you’ll be asked to write an initial draft of your philosophy of education. This draft will serve as the foundation of your philosophy project, which will be completed at the end of the course in lieu of a final exam. Due Wednesday, September 12.


Critical Response Paper 1: The Common School

Assignment Description: In this paper I’ll ask you to weigh the impact of the Common School movement on the development of American education. You’ll need to select one of the following statements as the thesis for your paper: either Common schools were essential to the early development of the Republic; or The Republic would have been better off without common schools. Due Wednesday, October 3.


Critical Response Paper 2: The Progressive Era

Assignment Description: In this paper you’ll need to consider the impact of the Progressive movement on education and society. You’ll select one of the following statements as the thesis for your paper: either The Progressives were truly progressive, bringing much-needed change to American education; or The “Progressives,” at least where education was concerned, were not really progressive at allDue Wednesday, October 31.


Fourth Hour Bonus Reads

Assignment Description: Because Gettysburg College operates on a course unit system, rather than a credit-hour system, I need to ensure that you receive at least four full hours (“academic” hours, that is) of instruction every week. You’ll notice that we only meet for three. To meet that “fourth hour” requirement, you’ll need to complete a minimum of fourteen additional hours of assignments throughout the semester (approximately one hour per week). You can choose to satisfy the Fourth Hour requirement, in part, by reading the assignments on the course calendar denoted with a “B”; these are “bonus” reading assignments. Simply read the bonus read then write a brief essay (750 to 1,000 words) explaining how you think it fits into the themes of the course and the issues we’ve discussed. Each time you compete a bonus reading and submit an essay you’ll receive 3 hours of Fourth Hour credit.


Philosophy Project

Assignment Description: At the conclusion of the semester you will prepare a project, in five parts, that articulates your philosophy of education. In your project you will be asked to consider purpose, content, and pedagogy as they relate to the way schooling occurs in the United States, and you’ll be asked to consider the relationship between schools and society. Finally, you’ll be asked to describe your “ideal” school. If you plan to enter the Teacher Education program your course project will be reviewed as you complete your requirements in the program. It may or may not serve as the cornerstone of a portfolio or something. Due Tuesday, December 11.

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